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RESIDENTS OF AIMERAHUN HAVE IMPROVED WATER SUPPLY
During the dry season the residents of the bairos of Tursalefa and Fatuk Klot in Aimerahun, just one hours drive from Dili, would need to rely on neighbours for their water supply. A water system first built in 1968 and then rehabilitated in 2000 was no longer working. Thanks to the collective action of the District Water and Sanitation Service (Serbisu Aqua no Saneamentu or SAS) and funding from BESIK, the NGO Biahula was able to ensure that 65 households (457 people) now have a more reliable water supply. Read more....

WASH FOR EVERYONE, EVERYWHERE  
In March, Australian Government and BESIK supported Government of Timor-Leste staff to attend a WASH conference in Brisbane. More than 300 government and NGO WASH sector leaders from the Pacific, Asia and Africa exchanged experiences and learning to improve service delivery.  Also, BESIK's National Water Services Adviser brought back some key learnings: talk the big dream, not the little pilot. Read more...

GETTING IT GOING AND KEEPING IT FLOWING.   
Rural water services in many countries perform poorly after the initial capital investments have been made. Dr Richard Carter explains that an investment in operations and management reaches coverage targets quicker than a business as usual approach.   Read more...

MAKING WATER MANAGEMENT GROUPS STRONGER   
There have been three studies into the functionality of Water Management Groups (GMFs), conducted at the request of the Secretary of State for Water and Sanitation. These explore women’s contributions in GMFs, the effectiveness of technical training for members and strategies to increase the sustainability of GMFs  Read more...

HAND WASHING WITH SOAP CAMPAIGN PRODUCES RESULTS
 
The Ministry of Health's Hand washing with Soap campaign, consisting of television advertisements and a series of activities in communities is producing results.  
Read more...

NATIONAL WATER RESOURCE PLANNING IS IMPORTANT
National management of water resources needs to be based on sound data about water sources and their quality.  Read more...



CONTACT US
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Email
info@besiktimor.org
Program Office
DNSA Compound (Ministry of Public Works)
Rua Jacinto Candido,
Caicoli, Dili,
Timor-Leste
Postal Address
P.O. Box 17, Dili,
Timor-Leste 
ABOUT BESIK
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BESIK  (Bee, Saneamentu no Ijiene iha Komunidade) is an Australian Government funded program transforming the lives of rural communities in Timor-Leste (East Timor). The program's goal is to work in partnership with the Government of Timor-Leste (GoTL) to improve the health and quality of life of people living in rural areas. The program supports GoTL's progress towards 2015 Millenium Development Goal targets so that rural communities will have sustainable and equitable access to safe water supply, improved sanitation and hygiene.

BESIK supports the lead role of GoTL to expand service delivery at national and district level. It works mainly with the Ministry of Public Works and Ministry of Health but also with other Ministries and sector partners (international agencies, non-government organisations (NGOs), training institutions) and the private sector.

The current phase commenced in September 2012; a previous phase was implemented from 2007-2012. The current program is characterised by having a greater focus on working through Government systems, service delivery, operations and maintenance, developing a schools program and evidenced-based models for service delivery.

 
KEY ROLE FOR WOMEN
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The roles of women and men are considered in all BESIK activities and the role of women is promoted actively by the program with its partners.  As a result, gender equity has been improving in the WASH sector in Timor-Leste. There is better understanding of the importance of gender within the National Directorates for Water Services, Basic Sanitation, and Water Resources (DNSA, DNSB and DNCQA) as evidenced by annual plans which include minimum quotas (50% women in any new recruitments) and in community structures. 

Women’s intake into community water management groups (GMFs) significantly increased after 2010 (when 30% quotas were introduced) together with gender sensitive materials. Women’s participation in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) activities at community level grew together with increased emphasis on the importance of women’s involvement in community decision making.  Women began increasingly taking up technical roles within GMFs. However, there has been little change in the overall percentage of total female GMF members since that initial increase and this need to be explored.


Several studies were completed in 2013 to inform BESIK’s understanding of the functioning and capacity of Water Management Groups (GMF) with a significant focus on women’s roles. T
he GMF Study reports a positive correlation between women's participation, GMF functionality  and water system functionality.  Small in-depth inquiries provide potential explanations: women are effectiveness as people managers and problem solvers, have skill such as managing money and a stronger commitment to functioning water systems (as primary users and collectors of water).